Documentary Archives - Shoot|Photographers Agent London | Shoot|Photographers Agent London

More Cuba.  A lady with a Havana cigar from Pip‘s Cuba project.  See more here

More Cuba.  A lady with a Havana cigar from Pip‘s Cuba project.  See more here

The brewers Marstons hired Gavin Watson to create the story for their “From Burton With Love” ad campaign and product launch.  The idea was to get back their roots in their home town of Burton on Trent with a cast of employees, their friends and families; an ideal vehicle for Gavin’s blend of reportage and high energy realism.

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Marstons, one of the great names in British beer – their Pedigree ale is an all time classic – have decided to update both their profile and their product range for the age of craft beers and microbreweries.  The campaign goes back to the very roots of the business in the home town of British brewing and aligns Marstons with what their marketing director Lee Williams described as “the authenticity and simplicity of the new beer scene.”

Given the brief, Gavin’s style was the perfect fit and, as it says in the foreword of his book ‘Skins and Punks’, he has the ability to make ‘ordinary’ people look like legends.   The campaign characters were all street cast either from the Marstons workforce, including head brewer Pat McGinty, or the general population of Burton and the story was shot in various locations in the brewery and the town.

“I wanted places that people would recognise,” Gavin said, talking about the choices of key locations and local landmarks, “I wanted to capture the spirit of a place – making it look as dramatic but as real as possible – about what it is to live and breathe in this town.  The ‘secondary town’ thing resonates with me. Burton still has its industry and it filled me with joy when I came to a town that still means something.

It’s in the blood; in the water. If you’re going to live, grow and die in this town you’re going to be connected to brewing in some way. You can sense it as soon as you get off the train.”

Art direction and the ideas that inspired the campaign come from Big Al’s Creative Emporium.

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Westin commissioned Pip to produce his own personal take on their factory, its processes and the people that work in it.

Westin is based in Huddersfield and produces hi-tech kitchen equipment for a worldwide market.  ‘I just think the processes and the look of things in that kind of engineering factory are fascinating.’ said Pip ‘ Especially where they are welding and working with sheets of metal you get these amazing textures and reflections.  You close in on things and they become completely abstract but beautiful.’

 

 

 

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Pip spent some time at the end of 2015 in Cuba and here is a foretaste of the pictures from the trip.  When he has finished editing the whole trip Pip is planning to produce a book of his Cuban images and perhaps even an exhibition.

‘ I had always wanted to go to Cuba, it just fascinated me, a country in a state of suspended animation, a place I really wanted to photograph.  But it’s changing and now relations with the US are getting better it’s going to change even more.  I decided that if I didn’t go now it could be too late and the Cuba I wanted to see would have gone.  But it was amazing, still a very special place with incredible people.’

There will be updates on Pip’s Cuba project later in the year.

Dance class

Dance class

Dance class

Dance class

Dance class

New personal work by Liam Arthur

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It’s 60 years this week since ‘Rock Around the Clock’ by Bill Haley and The Comets hit number one in ‘the hit parade’ and teds invented teenage rebellion!  And as Jay Brooks reveals in this personal project they are still at it – though noticeably less teenage.

When teds rioted at the Trocadero Cinema in Elephant and Castle, fired up by the rock and roll soundtrack of the movie ‘Blackboard Jungle’, they sent middle England into the first of many moral panics and blazed the trail for the mods, rockers, skins and punks that followed them.

The teds – or teddy boys to give them their full title – in Jay’s pictures are a little more mature and stop short of riot but only just.  As you can see they still enjoy what teds have always enjoyed sharp suits, beer, rock and roll and the odd fag.

See more of Jay’s teds on his website here

 

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In November 2014 Liam Arthur traveled to The West Bank to help pick olives and to photograph the people there who live their ordinary lives against an extraordinary back ground of sectarianism and strife.  The result is ‘Occupied – Portraits of The West Bank’ a gentle but powerful set of images that reveal the everyday life that lies behind the drama and the violence of the news feeds.  The pictures are moving because they capture moments of normalness, kids go to school and play football,  farmers pick olives and tend goats.  But it is all against the unseen but ever present background of the conflict between Israel and the Palestinians.

‘Occupied – Portraits of The West Bank’ is currently featured on the photo mag website Of The Land and Us together with an article by Liam about his journey and how he created the project.

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If you haven’t been already, you still have two weeks to get down to One Nation Under A Groove, Youth Club Archive‘s multimedia celebration of everything sub-cultural at the Southbank Centre.

The photographic exhibition features 120 images from the PYMCA Archive which chart the twists and turns of style and youth culture over the last half century, with work from 50 photographers including Shoot’s Gavin Watson who provided the poster image above.

There’s also a screening room showing Dazed Digital‘s acclaimed Music Nation series and documentaries from independent film makers, like Will Robson-Scott and Nick Cunard, as well as a host of other cool things to do.

One Nation Under A Groove is open every day at SE1 8XX, The Festival Village under the Queen Elizabeth Hall.  So get on down!

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Ray Burmiston has been working with Discovery Channel and the actor Idris Elba on his new show Idris Elba : No Limits.  The show reveals that Idris, apart from being an acclaimed and accomplished actor is an unashamed petrol-head who often does his own car stunts and harbours a strong desire to enter the world of motor sport.

In each of the four episodes Idris tackles a different life threatening discipline: rally driving, aerobatics, drag racing and a land speed record attempt in a Bentley on a beach.  Throughout the series and in various locations Ray was tasked with recording and capturing moments as Idris took on the various challenges, ‘Armed,’ as Discovery put it,’ with no experience but an abundance of courage, grit and determination.’

Nepal earthquake Liam arthur

Nepal earthquake Liam arthur

Nepal earthquake Liam arthur

Nepal earthquake Liam arthur

Nepal earthquake Liam arthur

Nepal was devastated by a powerful and violent earthquake on 25th April this year.  It was a disaster on an epic scale, nearly 9000 dead, thousands made homeless, towns and villages flattened.  Liam Arthur was among the hundreds of volunteers that flew to the stricken country to give help in the aftermath.  Working for the NGO Shelterbox in the dual roles of aid worker and photographer he helped provide shelter for people whose homes had been destroyed and, in his photographs, recorded their stories and their situation.  The images here are some of the people that he met while distributing aid to one of the worst hit areas east of Katmandu.

Liam is adamant about the importance of the role of the photographer in this situation.  “As a photographer my role is to document the disaster and bring back stories and media that describe the situation and the people affected. There is no brief as such except to provide material that can be used by the organisation to publicise the situation on the ground and the efforts to help. We often have a unique view and access – as the second part of my role is to help facilitate the importation and distribution of aid to the affected communities. Being closely involved with the people affected gives you an element of trust and understanding with them, often allowing you to get under the surface, under an exterior often toughened by the catastrophic events that have claimed so many lives, to the real feelings underneath.

Being sensitive to the people that you are photographing in disaster situations is vital not only for them but also for the medium of photography to be trusted across the world as a method of revealing a peoples need for help without exploiting those that you are trying to help in the first place. Often it is hard to avoid the cliched images that we so often see, but the more that you talk to the affected communities the more you tend to see the strength and resilience of the human condition.  I would hope a little of this strength shows in the portraits of people who have suffered greatly at the hands of the unforgiving mountains that they inhabit.

They are not a community to be pitied but one of courage and strength, to be supported and helped to build back stronger and better. Unfortunately the disaster here has only begun, with the monsoon rain coming followed by a harsh winter in mountains that were prone to landslides before the earthquakes. Images have the power to keep us engaged in a world who’s attention span is ever shortening. It is important that the stories keep getting told. It is important that we see what needs to be done so that we can empathise and support the people that so generously gave us their stories to tell. But most importantly it is important that we do it with integrity.”